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  • October 18, 2017

    Implementing an industrial acoustical control strategy goes far beyond selecting an insulation with a high NRC (noise reduction coefficient) value. There are nuances and details that are key to understanding the acoustical needs of the system and selecting the appropriate materials to address those needs.

  • October 18, 2017

    In any work environment, there can be many reasons to keep sound levels within a reasonable range. Sound levels above this range are perceived as "noise." Noise can distract the workforce, creating an unsafe workplace. Or, worse yet, it can cause hearing loss.

  • October 18, 2017

    The following are 10 simple noise control techniques that have wide application across the whole of industry. In many cases, they will produce substantial noise reductions quickly and cheaply - with little or no effect on normal operation or use.

    Click here to read more about noise control techniques that you can use in industrial facilities.

  • October 18, 2017

    Noise induced hearing loss is a permanent hearing impairment resulting from prolonged exposure to high levels of noise. One in 10 Americans has a hearing loss that affects his or her ability to understand normal speech. Excessive noise exposure is the most common cause of hearing loss. The National Institute of Health reports that about 15 percent of Americans aged 20 to 69 have high frequency hearing loss related to occupational or leisure activities. Because of occupational risk of noise induced hearing loss, there are government standards regulating allowable noise exposure.

  • October 4, 2017

    We recently published Part 1 of the blog series,Don’t Settle When It Comes to Vibration. The previous blog addressed several types of insulation that you can use in high-temperature industrial applications where vibration is a component of the environment.

  • October 4, 2017

    Loud noise at work can damage hearing. Approximately 22 million U.S. workers are exposed to hazardous noise at work. To minimize occupational noise-induced hearing loss, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends that workers should not be exposed to noise at a level that amounts to more than 85 decibels (dBA) for 8 hours. To create a more healthful workplace, NIOSH recommends an approach based on the hierarchy of control.

    Click here to learn about the hierarchy of control and how you can use it to control noise in your facility. 

  • October 4, 2017

    Twenty-two million workers are exposed to potentially damaging noise at work each year. Last year, U.S. business paid more than $1.5 million in penalties for not protecting workers from noise.

    While it's impossible to put a number to the human toll of hearing loss, an estimated $242 million is spent annually on workers' compensation for hearing loss disability.

    Each of the elements below is critical to understand in order to ensure that workers are being protected where noise levels are unable to be reduced below the OSHA required levels.

  • October 4, 2017

    Power plant noise control and the principles of acoustic engineering apply universally to virtually every type of facility. The approach is all the same. Noise control becomes a driving factor when having to meet some regulatory or environmental noise requirement. In critical facilities and control rooms it is imperative to have effective communications, which requires a low-noise environment; noisy environments can be quite fatiguing and adversely affect production.

    Click here to read more about how to address industrial noise control. 

  • September 21, 2017

    High-temperature, industrial insulations operate in hostile environments that would melt, shatter, or otherwise destroy other types of insulating materials such as plastics, fiberglass, or foam rubber. These environments not only reach extreme temperatures, but they can also be rigorously demanding as a result of heavy vibration caused by the proximity and concentration of motors, valves, and high pressure steam.  In these kinds of environments, higher than normal levels of vibration are part of the design equation that engineers or specifiers must consider.

  • September 21, 2017

    Excessive equipment vibration is a common issue experienced in industrial processes and facilities. Excessive vibration is most often caused by misalignment of equipment or components, unbalanced rotating equipment, or loose components (e.g. bolts). If not addressed, prolonged vibration can result in damage to equipment and may even cause system failure. Fixed, rotating, and structural assets are all susceptible to problems caused excessive vibration.