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  • March 22, 2017

    At Johns Manville, our technical teams continually collaborate with industrial industry experts to provide the latest information designers need to consider when specifying insulating materials for industrial applications. As part of that effort, two of our leading technical experts, Dr. Ames Kulprathipanja, JM Innovation Leader, and David Shong, Sr. Specification Representative, are proud to present the following topics at the upcoming National Association for Corrosion Engineers (NACE) Corrosion Conference & Expo in New Orleans, Louisiana on March 26-30:

  • March 22, 2017

    So, CUI is one of the most difficult processes to prevent. The reason for that is, by and large, no matter the precautions taken, water invariably seeps into the insulation and begins its dirty work—sometimes unseen until process leakage occurs. Historical data shows that about 60% of pipe leaks are caused by CUI. Read the article.

  • March 22, 2017

    NACE International today released the "International Measures of Prevention, Application and Economics of Corrosion Technology (IMPACT)" study, in which it estimates the global cost of corrosion to be US$2.5 trillion, equivalent to roughly 3.4 percent of the global Gross Domestic Product (GDP). The two-year global study released at the CORROSION 2016 conference in Vancouver, B.C., examined the economics of corrosion and the role of corrosion management in establishing industry best practices.

  • March 22, 2017

    Corrosion will cost the U.S. economy over $1.1 trillion in 2016. That’s one of the largest expenditures we make, and it’s all going down the drain. The total annual corrosion costs in the U.S. rose above $1 trillion in the middle of 2013, illustrating the broad and expensive challenge that corrosion presents to equipment and materials and is now estimated at $1.1 trillion for 2016. These estimates are based on a landmark study by NACE that estimated (direct) corrosion costs were $276B in 1998 as reported in the NACE Corrosion Costs Study.

  • March 8, 2017

    In our previous passive fire protection (PFP) blog we discussed the importance of structural PFP and how using insulation as part of a PFP strategy is beginning to gain traction. In Part 2 of this blog series, we’ll explore the second camp of PFP: pressure-relief systems. 

    Click here to watch the recorded webinar
    "Passive Fire Protection: How Insulation Can be Part of Your Strategy."

  • March 8, 2017

    Designing pressure-relief systems is a high-stakes endeavor that leave little room for error. This article discusses pressure-relief valves and systems in detail, covering everything from relief device selection to liquid discharge considerations. When it comes to such critical systems, mistakes can be extremely costly. This article is an exceptional resource for anyone looking for crucial details on pressure-relief systems and how they interact with the facilities where they operate. Click here to read more about relief valves and relief systems. 

  • March 8, 2017

    When pipes or vessels rupture, the time frame for urgent repairs is incredibly limited. Typically, maintenance engineers are in a race against time to make the repair and ensure that it will hold – either indefinitely or until a better solution can be implemented. Often times, they are also constrained by the available materials, whether or not those materials can be used for the temperature range of the application, and direct access to the rupture to make the repair. This article delves into the critical details that go into making emergency, in-situ repairs.

  • March 8, 2017

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires most oil and gas facilities to have fire prevention plans in place; however, as a whole, there are a number of additional steps facility managers and workers can take to help improve upon OSHA standards and further reduce the risk of fires. This blog details five steps you can take to ensure that your facility is operating as safely as possible. Click here to read more about fire protection for oil and gas workers.

  • February 23, 2017

    Passive fire protection (PFP) generally falls into two categories. The first is for structural steel members – you’ll find these in industrial settings as supports for tanks, vessels, and pipe racks.  The second category is for protecting the actual pipes, tanks and vessels that are common to industrial or manufacturing facilities. PFP is critical to the safety of building occupants, plant workers, and the surrounding communities, and both of these categories have specific nuances that require unique materials.

  • February 23, 2017

    Pressure-relief systems are a crucial component to many industrial facilities. They operate as a failsafe in the event of a fire, helping to prevent pipes and vessels that contain volatile liquids from rupturing or exploding because of the rapid rise in internal pressure from the heated liquids. Given the high stakes that go into designing and installing effective pressure-relief systems, it’s critical to make sure you avoid common pitfalls that can hinder the effectiveness of your passive fire protection pressure-relief strategy. Read Avoid Pressure-Relief System Pitfalls.