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  • 08/09/17
    David Shong
    Did you know there are two “new” ASTM standard specifications for metal jacketing?  If you haven’t heard this, don’t feel bad – you aren’t alone.  Our very own regional technical managers at JM IIG have commented that they have rarely met an owner, engineer, distributor, or contractor that has heard about these two new specifications, even though these standards have been in the industry for close to 5 years.  Despite their lack of notoriety, these standards are now availablemore...
  • 08/09/17
    Engineering 360
    Insulation jacketing consists of an outer covering that is wrapped around tubing or pipe insulation to protect the insulation from moisture, wear and mechanical damage. The jacket also serves to provide support for the insulation and establish the system emissivity and appearance. Insulation jacketing plays an important role in the efficiency of the insulation.The type of jacketing used depends on the mechanical, chemical, thermal, and moisture conditions of the installation as well as costmore...
  • 08/09/17
    Gary Whittaker
    Insulation is rarely installed as a stand-alone item. Instead, insulation material is part of a system that includes the insulation; the securement; a vapor barrier, in the case of low-temperature applications; and an outer layer that might be referred to as the cover, jacket or lagging.more...
  • 08/09/17
    Gordon H. Hart
    Jacketing applied over mechanical insulation can serve several purposes. Regardless of the type of jacketing and insulation, jacketing is used to ensure both the short-term and long-term performance of the insulation in the particular application. Assuming the jacketing is specified, manufactured, supplied, and installed correctly, over time it will only perform as designed if properly maintained.more...
  • 08/09/17
    JM Editors
    In one week, we’ll be hosting the live webinar, “The Drive Toward Healthier Buildings,”  – a deep dive into the trends and evolutions in sustainable building practices. In anticipation of this presentation, we took a little time to sit down with one of our co-presenters, Diana Fisler, Ph.D., Building and Science Innovation Leader at Johns Manville, to get her thoughts on the shifting trends toward sustainable living.more...
  • 08/09/17
    Kelsey Blongewicz
    Are you planning to complete a LEED review this year, before Greenbuild? If so, be sure to submit for review on time. See below for application deadlines based on typical review timelines.The following deadlines apply to all commercial rating systems (not including LEED Volume). These timelines also assume that no appeal review is necessary. Appeal reviews typically take 20–25 business days; expedited appeal reviews take about 10 business days. more...
  • 08/09/17
    sbdAdmin
    Solar panel “wings” will power Joyce Centre for Partnership & Innovation at Mohawk Collage, the result of a progressive net-zero design by mcCallumSather and B+H Architects.more...
  • 08/09/17
    Adam C. Uzialko
    From improving energy efficiency to mitigating the impacts of climate change, businesses have been working to meet the demand of a marketplace that's ever-more ecologically conscious. As the shift has occured, executives have learned that "greening" operations isn't just an ethical or marketable endeavor, but a profitable one as well. One industry in which this shift has been markedly noticeable is construction, where companies have turned to new, more efficient techniques, especially when itmore...
  • 07/26/17
    Brennan Hall
    When it comes to selecting fiberglass duct insulation, engineers must decide between specifying either duct liner or duct wrap. Each insulation offers different benefits that can make one or the other more applicable in certain settings. Fortunately, for many applications, either one will perform effectively. That said, the two materials are not identical across the board in terms of performance, and engineers need to be aware of their unique differences to specify the best material for themore...
  • 07/26/17
    HVAC Insider
    A new Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study involving 196 cooling towers nationwide found that 84 percent contained Legionella DNA, indicating that the dangerous bacteria that causes a severe, even fatal type of pneumonia were present or had been at some point. This means the real question is not ‘if there will be another outbreak’ but only ‘where and when’ it will occur.“During 2000–2014, passive surveillance for legionellosis in the United States demonstrated a 286% increasemore...