Navigation
  • July 12, 2017

    Contractors are an eternally optimistic bunch and never seem to allow for any weather related impacts on construction projects. What, are you really going to work on a twelve month long project and think you won’t encounter rain, winds, summer, and winter at some stage in the course of your project! Click here to read more about how to prevent weather delays from stopping you in your tracks. 

  • June 27, 2017

    Earlier this month, we hosted a live webinar with Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) about the latest advancements in corrosion under insulation (CUI) research (click here to watch a recording of the webinar).

    After the webinar, we sat down for a one-on-one interview with our co-host from SwRI, Leo Caseres, to get his insights on the leading issues we face pertaining to CUI and what he sees for the future of CUI research.

  • June 27, 2017

    As Marc Grenier discussed in The Corrosion Under Insulation Plague: What You Need to Know, corrosion under insulation (CUI) is one of the most difficult corrosion processes to prevent. The reason for that is, by and large, no matter the precautions taken, water invariably seeps into the insulation and begins its dirty work—sometimes unseen until process leakage occurs. Data shows that about 60% of pipe leaks are caused by CUI. That’s not good.

  • June 27, 2017

    Deterioration due to corrosion of materials, parts and components during transportation and temporary storage during interstage manufacturing is a persistent problem in the industry. It causes direct material losses as well as indirect losses. Due to temporary corrosion, time is diverted to handling complaints and customer loyalty is potentially lost. Delayed deliveries due to reworking of corroded components translate to avoidable losses. Therefore, planning for corrosion protection during temporary storage and transportation is a logical strategy to minimize these losses.

  • June 27, 2017

    At BTU Analytics we write many Energy Market Commentary (EMC) pieces on detailed production results in specific plays, today this post will back-off and look at larger trends in the energy markets – specifically how gas and renewables drive US decarbonization trends.  First in this post we will look at world fuel consumption compared to US fuel consumption over time.  In developed countries, fuel switching in energy markets is continuously changing driven by technology, production costs, and regulation to name a few.

  • May 31, 2017

    All mechanical systems, including insulation systems, require periodic inspections and maintenance to ensure that the cladding or insulation materials are not damaged, compromised, or even missing altogether.  Failure to conduct these inspections in a timely manner or document repairs/replacement of insulating materials can result in compromised personnel protection, reduced process efficiency and control, increased rates of corrosion, and ongoing economic losses in energy efficiency – to name just a few.

  • May 31, 2017

    Giving birth to invention out of necessity, a group of UA scientists found a new way to combat industrial corrosion — and a new, cleaner method of metals extraction for the mining industry in the bargain.

    The work of the University of Arizona’s Dominic Gervasio and his colleagues has led to the launch of two companies, Caltrode and MetOxs, to commercialize the technologies with the help of Tech Launch Arizona.

  • May 31, 2017

    When it comes to corrosion under insulation (CUI), I tend to call it a "minefield," and for more than one reason. It’s not only a hidden phenomenon, but it's also one that can really come back to bite companies who don’t invest in a good CUI mitigation strategy, because sooner or later, those companies are going to get their names in the papers due to unwanted accidents, production loss and environmental damages. (Gain an introduction to CUI in Understanding Insulation Chemistry Proven to Inhibit CUI.)

  • May 31, 2017

    The proper design to minimize corrosion is as important as the selection of materials. In many structures, a lack of design consideration given to corrosion control is the weakest link in corrosion control. Designers should have skills to determine the mechanical properties and strength required to ensure that a structure is resistant to corrosion. A background and solid understanding of the corrosion process is important as well. While selecting materials, the designer has to consider the particular environment, use, and the corrosion control parameters.

  • May 17, 2017

    The most recent estimates from the National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE) put the global cost of corrosion into the trillions of dollars1. These costs include corrosion in the industrial industry where corrosion under insulation (CUI) has been plaguing the industry for decades. To help combat this, industry experts have come up with a number of different technologies and methods to help prevent corrosion.